Tag Archives: Submission

Invitation to a Yoking, Part 2

Come to Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.  Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.  For My yoke is easy and My burden is light.

Matthew 11:28-30 (NKJV)

What was the audience’s reaction to Christ’s invitation to a yoking? The yoke was a figure of bondage and burden borne by slaves (Ex.5:5-7).  Why would anyone want to wear it?  The incentive to respond “positively” to Christ’s invitation is based on the following.

Who was the provider of the yoke?  “Come unto Me.'” Christ was the Yoke.  God the son was offering Himself to those who were hurting and in need of relief; relief from the hypocrisy and indifference of the religious institutions of that day and relief from social injustice and oppression by the Roman Empire.  Christ came to offer justice and hope where none existed—a holy commission that could only be accomplished by the God of Creation (Jer. 32:17).  Only He could fulfill that which He promised (2 Cor. 1:20).

What was the purpose of the yoke?   “Take my yoke…Learn of Me.” These two actions—take and learn—highlight the role personal responsibility plays in acceptance of Christ’s invitation to salvation.  The yoke of Christ represents His lordship over the life of the believer. Under His yoke, they would learn to live using “kingdom principles” (Col. 3:12-14) versus the ways of a fallen world.  Believers could be fully confident that the Provider of the yoke would accomplish a purpose that would result in their good and God’s glory (Rom.8:28).

What was the privilege of the yoke?  “Rest for your souls.” Christ alone, by His person and work, could accomplish two holy mandates. First, He could reconcile men to God (2 Cor. 5:18).  The intimacy man once experienced with God in the Garden could now be restored at the foot of the Cross.  Secondly, He could offer “rest” by the removal of sin’s guilt and the provision of eternal life (Rom. 6:23).  Therefore, Christ’s yoke was “easy and light”.

Christ’s invitation to yoking is still being extended today. He is patiently waiting for nonbelievers to take His yoke and learn of Him.  Believers, as “true yoke fellows” (Phil. 4:2-3) are to be likeminded in our efforts to share the Gospel at every opportunity (Matt. 28:19-20).  The yoke of Christ offers both “blessing and burden” to those who would wear it.  It is in its wearing that God gives the strength to receive both.

The word “stiff-necked” originated in ancient Israel.  lf the oxen didn’t want to follow the guidance from the farmer, it would stiffen the muscles in its neck. This makes it impossible to guide the ox where it needed to go.  Are you following the Spirit’s “lead” or are you “stiff-necked” like an oxen?

Invitation to a Yoking, Part 1

 

 

“Come to Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For My yoke is easy and My burden is light.”   Matthew 11:28-30 (KJV)

How do you respond when you receive an invitation? What are your criteria for rendering a positive response? Do you first identify the   sender of the invitation? Are they a friend, a casual acquaintance, or part of an exclusive circle you’d like to join? Do you evaluate the event?  Will a similar invitation be offered at a later time or is this a special occasion?  lnvitations, by their very nature, infer a “closed event”, therein requiring a special request for entry. However, when Jesus extended His invitation “to come”, He invited “not the wise, the mighty, or the noble” (1 Cor. 1:25) but to those in greatest need of Him–“they that labor and are heavy laden.” And to what was He inviting those who heard Him that day? His yoke.

The yoke is a powerful symbol in the Bible. The literal references to the yoke speak of a wooden bar or frame used to join animals to enable them to pull a load, a plow, often together so they could work in tandem. When used in the Old Testament, the yoke is often used figuratively of bondage and of the burden borne by slaves (Ex. 6:6-7). The image is used powerfully by the prophets to portray the fate of disobedient generations (ls. 10:27; Jer. 27:11; Ex.34:27).  ln most of the Old Testament references, the yoke is a negative image–something a person would do virtually anything to avoid.

But Jesus turns his paradoxical rhetoric to represent something “good”–subjection to Him: “Take my yoke upon you and learn from me,  and you will find rest for your souls.  For my yoke is easy and my burden is light” (Mt 11:29-30 NIV). Jesus saw the need of the people at that time. He saw a religious system that was demanding yet indifferent to the needs of its people. He saw a social system that was unjust and oppressive. Jesus saw a hurting world in need of a Messiah.    Very much like our world today.   When Jesus entered the synagogue in Nazareth on Sunday morning, He confidently proclaimed:

“The Spirit of the LORD is upon Me, Because He has anointed Me To preach the gospel to the poor; He has sent Me to heal the brokenhearted, To proclaim liberty to the captives And recovery of sight to the blind, To set at liberty those who are oppressed; To proclaim the acceptable year of the LORD.” Then He closed the book, and gave it back to the attendant and sat down. And the eyes of all who were in the synagogue were fixed on Him. And He began to say to them, “Today this Scripture is fulfilled in your hearing.” (Luke 4:78-21)

Christ’s yoke is very different from the world’s yoke. The world’s yoke presents itself in the form of fear, guilt, and shame.  lt is heavy, demanding, and burdensome.  Christ’s yoke is “easy” and consists of forgiveness, love, and acceptance. Christ’s “burden” is light because He took the full weight of sin on Himself at the Cross.

Was Jesus’ reference to the yoke, a “symbolic invitation” to join Him and find in His strength release from unbearable burdens? Or was it “His call” to people to become His slaves and experience freedom from the crushing weight they experience from the Law and religious activity?  ln either case, the theme and the invitation are central. Jesus still calls, “Come,” and He promises us “rest for our souls.”  Accept His invitation today and let Him “lighten” your load.

The Character of Obedience

“And having been perfected, He became the author of eternal salvation to all who obey Him.” Heb. 5:9 (NKJ)

Obedience—is it an outcome of our faith walk or is it the means by which spiritual maturity is accomplished?

A discussion of obedience seems most appropriate for the Lenten Season.  As I read the accounts of the apostles and other great propagators of the faith, it is evident that obedience played a major role in their faith walk. The hallmark of obedience is modeled by our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Christ is the perfect model as we too journey to the Cross.

The Apostle Paul uses the Greek word for obedience, hupekoos.  Hupo mean “under” and akous means “to hear”.  Christ was under the direction and conviction of God.  He was obedient to the law of God that stated that without the shedding of blood there could be no remission of sin (Heb. 9:22).

We see the character of obedience displayed through the humility of Christ.Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation, taking the form of a bondservant, and coming in the likeness of men.  And being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself and became obedient to the point of death, even the death of the cross.”  Philippians 2:5-8

In this text, the Apostle Paul uses the Greek word hupekoos.  Hupo mean “under” and akous means “to hear”.  Christ was under the direction and conviction of God.  He was obedient to the law of God that stated that without the shedding of blood there could be no remission of sin (Heb. 9:22).   He humbled Himself as Deity and as a man, shed His blood for our sins.

We see the character of obedience displayed through the submission of Christ.  “Therefore, as through one man’s offense judgment came to all men, resulting in condemnation, even so through one Man’s righteous act the free gift came to all men, resulting in justification of life.  For as by one man’s disobedience many were made sinners, so also by one Man’s obedience many will be made righteous.” Romans 5:18-19

Here obedience is the Greek word hupakoe which means “attentive harkening, compliance or submission”.  It usually refers to obedience to God’s will in a “special sense”—of willing subjection.  Unlike the animals used in previous sacrifices, Christ came willingly to the Cross.  He expressed His submission to God’s will in the Garden of Gethsemane as He repeated “not My will but Your will be done” (Matt. 26:39, 42; Mark 14:32-36).     

We see the character of obedience displayed through the suffering of Christ.  “(Jesus) who, in the days of His flesh, when He had offered up prayers and supplications, with vehement cries and tears to Him who was able to save Him from death, and was heard because of His godly fear, though He was a Son, yet He learned obedience by the things which He suffered.”  Hebrews 5:7-8

Hupakoe is still the translation of obedience here.  Through His suffering, Christ met the need for a human who could fit God’s righteous requirement (Matt. 5:13) and prove to be the perfect sacrifice to take the place of sinners (1 Pet. 3:18).  He “learned” obedience to confirm His humanity and to experience humanities’ suffering to the fullest (Luke 2:52).

“And having been perfected, He (Jesus) became the author of eternal salvation to all who obey Him” (Heb. 5:9).  To obey or hupakova is the manifestation of faith as revealed in the humble acceptance of the Gospel message.  This is our opportunity to display obedience.  Acceptance of the Gospel requires acceptance of Christ as not only Savior but also as Lord of our lives.  We no longer live for ourselves but for Him (Gal. 2:20; 1 Peter 4:2).  In obedience, we learn to have the “same mind of Christ”—obedient in humility, submission, and in suffering.

In a world where defiance and noncompliance is encouraged and revered, Christ offers a different model for living.   Just think, through His obedience two-thousand years earlier, He changed the “eternal outcome” to “all who obey Him” (Heb. 5:9).  Once destined to an eternity in hell, we now are partakers of eternal life (John 3:16).  That’s something to shout about!

Faith to Persevere: The Application

“All of these died in faith without having received the promises, but from a distance they saw and greeted them. They confessed that they were strangers and foreigners on the earth.”

Hebrews 11:13 (NRS)

 

All the Faith Hall of Famers “died in faith” not having received the promises but having seen them afar were persuaded of them, and embraced them, and confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on the earth (Heb. 11:13). The word “promises” in this text from Hebrews speaks specifically to the promised Messiah and their future heavenly inheritance.

As “partakers of God’s glory”, we have begun to receive the promises of God on “this side” of eternity (2 Pet. 1.3-11) with the glorious assurance of eternal life on “the other side.”  Informed with that knowledge of God (2 Cor. 4.6) and empowered by the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:8), we can move forward with that which God has set before us “being fully persuaded, that what He (God) had promised, He is able also to perform (Rom. 4:21).

Here are three (3) key principles we can adopt from the Faith Hall of Famers to develop persevering faith.

  1. We must believe that He who promises is faithful. This requires that we know Him “personally”. Our schedule should include daily communion and fellowship with Him to better understand His will and His ways (Col. 1:9; Rom. 8:27). Would you put your life in the hands of someone you don’t know personally?  Our confidence comes from knowing Him (Deut. 33:12).
  1. We must understand His promises for our life. This is not only those promises we want for ourselves but those He has designated in His Word for us.  Some scholars have cited 365 promises of God for His people—one for every day of the year. All the promises of God are “yes and amen” (2 Cor. 1:20).
  1. We must look past our experience here on earth. While we acknowledge our presence on “planet earth”, we must remind ourselves daily that we are “pilgrims” traveling through this temporary period called “time”.  “Seeing afar of” requires visual acuity beyond our natural sight resulting in seeing beyond what we can see.  (1 Cor. 2:14-16).

I close with these words from Oswald Chambers concerning faith that perseveres:

Have you been asking God what He is going to do? He will never tell you. God does not tell you what He is going to do—He reveals to you who He is. Believe God is always the God you know Him to be when you are nearest to Him. Then think how unnecessary and disrespectful worry is! Let the attitude of your life be a continual willingness to “go out” in dependence upon God, and your life will have a sacred and inexpressible charm about it that is very satisfying to Jesus. You must learn to “go out” through your convictions, creeds, or experiences until you come to the point in your faith where there is nothing between yourself and God.

SELAH:  Meditate on Hebrews 11:13 and then ask the Holy Spirit to reveal what holds you to this earth and unable to “see afar off”.