Tag Archives: Easter

The Reality of the Resurrection

“If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men the most pitiable.” 1 Corinthians 15:19 (NKJ)

 Christ has risen! (Matt. 28:6)  What now?  The Disciples and the New Testament Church would now face persecution and even death for their belief in Jesus Christ.  If they were to continue the work that Jesus began, they would now need to demonstrate the reality of the resurrection.

The Apostle Paul knew the importance of the resurrection and passionately defended its reality.  He shared the magnitude of the resurrection with the church at Corinth by highlighting the risk that would occur if they did not accept it as “fact” and demonstrate its impact in their lives (1 Corinthians 15).   This danger still exists for believers in the 21st century.  In verse 14 Paul begins to expound the casualty to Christianity if “Christ is not raised.”

First and foremost, our faith is in vain (v.14).  Imagine awakening to the news that Christ’s resurrection did not occur?  How would your belief system be affected?  In what or who would you place your hope and trust?  Second, if Christ is not raised, we as believers have falsely represented God (v.15).  Jesus’ resurrection is the cornerstone of God’s plan of eternal salvation for man (Hebrew 5:9).  Only God could supernaturally raise Christ from the dead (Acts 2:24; Ep. 1:20). To deny the resurrection would also be denying the power of God.  Third and most disturbing, Paul concludes if Christ is not raised, we are “still in our sins” AND our family and friends who have died “have perished” (v. 17).  It was for sin that Jesus was manifested (1 John 3:5) and through His resurrection that the power of death was destroyed (Heb. 2:14).

“The resurrection of Jesus showed that Christ’s oblation as the sacrificial lamb was accepted by God, which is the basis for the giving of the Spirit to believers and the forgiveness of sins.” [1]

Finally, our text for today (v. 19) sums up the dilemma that Christians and the world in general would face if there were no resurrection:  “If we have hope in Christ only for this life, we are the most miserable people in the world” (NLT). If this life is the total sum of our existence, then Christ would have died in vain and our future prospects would be consigned to the dust from which we were created.  Continuity of our existence would be halted with our last breathe.

I question whether we, as believers, fully understand the implications of Christ’s resurrection in the 21st century.  Year after year we proclaim, “Christ is risen!” on Easter Sunday often relegating it to a “social phenomenon” that occurred thousands of years ago.  Yes, we’re willing to accept Jesus’ atoning sacrifice and the gift of His Holy Spirit, but at the end of the day, what changes have we implemented in our lives to reflect the “supernatural manifestation” that took place on Resurrection Sunday?  The reality of Jesus’ resurrection should make a difference in how we live!  Are we living our life as Christ had hoped when He sacrificed His life for ours?  Are we doing “greater works” than Christ did, as He stated in John 14:12?  Are we living each day joyfully expecting His return? (2 Pet. 3:11-12)  NOW is the right time to rededicate our life to Christ and boldly demonstrate the reality of His resurrection.  Let our hallelujah ring out to witness that Christ is raised!

SELAH:  Imagine living today without the expectation of a future resurrection.  Journal the emotions you feel as you consider this ending for your life then praise God for the reality of Jesus’ resurrection.    

[1]  Baker’s Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology

Living in the Power of the Resurrection

“For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death,

we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection.” Romans 6:5 (NKJ)

 

Good Friday is a few days away.  Christ died for the ungodly (Rom. 5:6).  Resurrection Sunday is on the horizon.  Christ is risen! (Matt. 28:6)  And now, as a result of these two events, how are we to live?  I’m sure Christ’s disciples had the same question upon hearing of our Lord’s resurrection.  They received the resurrection proclamation from the women who visited the empty tomb early Easter morning (Matt. 28).  They had personally seen the glorified Christ “behind shut doors” (John 20:19-30).  Even after all this, the disciples did not fully understand the implications of the resurrection and how it would change their lives forever.  They lived through the suffering of the Cross.  They would now need to learn how to live in the power of the resurrection.

In the final days of His earthly life, Jesus hinted about this resurrection power.  He assured His disciples, “he who believes in Me, the works that I do he will do also; and greater works than these he will do” (John 14:12).

The Apostle Paul knew how to live in the power of the resurrection.  He wanted to not only “share in the fellowship of Christ’s sufferings” but also, to know Him and the power of His resurrection (Phil. 3:10).  Paul prayed that the church at Ephesus would understand “the power God that worked in Christ when He raised Him (Jesus) from the dead” (Eph. 1:19, 20).  The early New Testament church gained its potency and power through accessing that same resurrection power through the anointing and indwelling of the Holy Spirit.

How do twenty-first century believers live in the power of the resurrection?

Through the power of the Holy Spirit who lives within us.  We now are able to walk in victory.  Sin no longer has power over us (Romans 6).  Satan is crushed and we are free (Col. 2:15).  Though he would have us believe we are still lost, we have become new creatures in Christ (2 Cor. 5:17).  Though our memories and the world would tempt us on every side, we are able to walk in newness of life (Rom. 6:4).  Though we may sometimes “stumble and fall”, we know that nothing can separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord (Rom. 8:39).  We have been sealed with the Holy Spirit, our Guarantee, until we arrive in heaven (Eph. 1:13, 14).

Also read:  Our Resurrection Witness

We have received the resurrection proclamation.  Christ has personally come to dwell within our hearts.  We are witnesses to His existence.  After the resurrection, the disciples went back to their daily routines.  Peter even invited his cohorts to “go fishing” while they awaited their new orders from our Lord.  While we celebrate the resurrection of Christ once a year at Easter, we much daily tap into this power from on high.  Don’t go back to “business as usual”.  Tap into the resurrection power of God and finish the good work God has begun in you (Phil. 1:6).

Selah:  Ask the Holy Spirit to reveal any area of your life (relationships, attitudes, behaviors) where you need to access the power of the resurrection.  Then ask Him to help you develop next steps on what to do.

Are you willing to launch out?  Check out the link for more info!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPgfZbUxYFk&index=1&list=PLXZmuJ5W5m4HAmeSH2k6zZiuJvxJZXxLq

The Details of Redemption

“He [God] has delivered us from the power of darkness and conveyed us into the kingdom of the Son of His love, in whom we have redemption through His blood, the forgiveness of sins.”   Colossians 1: 13-14 (NKJ)

During my personal devotions this Lenten season, the scripture texts that resonate in my spirit deal with God’s work of redemption.  As believers, we are familiar with the concept of salvation, Jesus Christ’s substitutional death for our sins (Rom. 5: 8) but it is also important that we broaden our understanding to include “the details behind His death.”  This week, as part of our Lenten season studies, we will explore the “details of redemption.”

Redemption (apolutrosis) is the purchasing back of something that had been lost, by the payment of a ransom.

In the God’s plan of salvation, man was lost as a result of the entrance of sin into the world (Gen. 3).  Why was redemption required?  God’s holiness required that sin be “dealt with.”  Christ death provided “satisfaction of divine justice”—punishment for sin as well as a ransom from the curse and authority of the law.  How was redemption to be accomplished? “Not with the blood of goats and calves, but with His own blood He entered the Most Holy Place once for all, having obtained eternal redemption” (Heb. 9:12).  Who would redeem us?  “Inasmuch then as the children have partaken of flesh and blood, He Himself (Jesus Christ) likewise shared in the same, that through death He might destroy him who had the power of death, that is, the devil, and release those who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage”  (Heb. 2:14-15).

To further illustrate redemption, I offer this personal story.  I remember my parent’s “patient and tireless” love for me.  I especially remember their offer to assist me with my finances as I began my new career as an elementary teacher.  Like most young adults establishing themselves, I was indebted “to credit.”  My parents, after seeing me struggle would “pay off” my debt with my promise to limit my use of the credit card.  Well, a year later, I was back in debt.  My parents again, “made the offer to pay, I promised not to stray, but the debt would not stay away.”  This happened on many occasions, I’m embarrassed to say.   I finally had to decline their generous offer and learn to better manage my monies.  The point of this illustration is that my parents were willing to pay the debt to the creditors—my debt—a debt that they had no part in creating.

Likewise, God, our Heavenly Father, through His Son, has provided a way to eliminate our sin debt.  “Christ, who knew no sin, became sin for us that we might become the righteousness of God in Him” (2 Cor. 5:21).   The debt against us is not viewed as simply cancelled, but paid in full.  Christ’s blood is the “ransom” by which the deliverance of His people from the servitude of sin and from its penal consequences has been secured.   Why would God want to redeem man?  Because of His great love for us—we are His children and heirs to His kingdom.  He “patiently and tirelessly” loves us and desires that we would be free to realize all He has promised to and for us.  Just like my parents desired for me. 

Also read:  Meditating:  A Key to Hearing God?

SELAH:  Read and meditate on Romans 5:1-11.  Ask the Holy Spirit to show you specific areas of your life which Christ has redeem your life.  Then express prayer of gratitude for His gift of redemption.