Tag Archives: pray without ceasing

Divine Inquiry

So David inquired of the LORD, saying, “Shall I go up against the Philistines?  Will You deliver them into my hand?”

And the LORD said to David, “Go up, for I will doubtless deliver the Philistines into your hand.”    2 Samuel 5:19

This month we’ve focused on prayer—the intentionality of it (2017 NDP Post Mortem), the consistency of it (Pray without Ceasing) and the responsibility of it (Watch and Pray).  We closeout this series with a few insights as to another aspect of prayer that often goes “unpracticed”—divine inquiry.

Divine inquiry is the discipline of going FIRST to the Lord for guidance and direction.  It is not a new phenomenon and is detailed in both the Old and New Testament.  2 Samuel 5:17-25 recounts David’s use of divine inquiry in the defeat of the Philistines in the Valley of Rephaim.  On two occasions the irksome enemy of Israel was defeated by David.  In both instances, David defers to the Lord of Host to determine the best plan of attack.  The result was a resounding victory—driving back the Philistines a distance of fifteen (15) miles.  Thus friend and foe could see the evidence of God’s protection and power on David and his kingdom.

Although God desires to counsel and guide believers, we have, unfortunately, developed “habits of behavior” that hinder our ability to hear Him clearly.  As we move through life, we have, metaphorically, “gotten on the wrong BUS”—a bus that frequently takes us where we really don’t want to go.  And what are the results?  We miss the good things God has for our lives.

Busyness robs us of both energy and our ability to hear.  Busyness most often is the result of wrong priorities.  As a rule, we place priority on the things we value.  Hearing from God deserves first priority. It’s hard to hear God when you’re multitasking; He gets caught between our thoughts and His voice becomes “muted”.

Unbelief houses all the lies we believe about ourselves and about God.  We believe that God speaks to others but not us.  We attribute this excuse to “being humble” but in reality we don’t believe that God is (His existence) or God can (His power) or God will (His promises)—so why talk to Him?  There is always a “lie” in unbelief.

Self (sin, too) keep us from hearing from God.  This happens when “self” (versus God) rules our life—self-righteousness, self-esteem, self-sufficiency, self-promotion.  When self is on the “throne of our heart”, God finds no place for Him to sit (except on the outside).  Sin separates us from a holy God.  When sin dominates our life, God won’t talk or listen (Gen. 17:1).  This condition, however, can be corrected (1 John 1:9).

SELAH:  Are you on the “BUS”?  Meditate on who God is, what God can do, and what God will do just for you.

Watch and Pray

Pray always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit,

 and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication

for the saints.” Ephesians 6:18 (KJV)

As we continue our discussion on prayer, I’d like to offer another practice to incorporate into your prayer life and that is the practice of “watchfulness”.  “Watch and pray” has been a rally call for the saints since the recording of biblical history.  Whether the call came from Nehemiah and the builders of the Jerusalem wall (Neh. 4:9) or from those who would stand for the LORD (Jer. 51:12; Hab. 2:1), dedication to these two activities has been a resounding recipe for victory.  In our text today, watching and praying is a critical strategy to employ as believers engage in spiritual battle against Satan and his evil minions.  While this letter was written by the Apostle Paul to the church of Ephesus over a thousand years ago, it still holds wise counsel for believers today.

Paul writes this letter from prison concerning conflicts which have risen between the Jewish and Gentile believers.  Rather than maintaining every effort to maintain “unity in the faith” (Eph. 4:3-4), these new Christians had forgotten that the real enemy was Satan—“not flesh and blood, but the evil rulers and authorities of the unseen world, against those mighty powers of darkness who rule this world, and against wicked spirits in the heavenly realms” (Eph. 6:12, NLT).  They are exhorted to “stay alert and be persistent in their prayers for all Christians everywhere.”

Also read:  The Key of the Greater Works by Oswald Chambers

This rendering of “watching” (agrpneo) is used in the New Testament only four (4) times with the first two found in the Gospels (Mark 13:33; Luke 2:36).   In these accounts Jesus speaks to his disciples about watching as it relates to end times and their readiness for His imminent return.  Jesus warns them to be “circumspect, attentive, and ready.”  The author of Hebrews uses watching to encourage “constant vigilance over someone or something”.  The image is one drawn from shepherds and their watch over their sheep.  It conveys the seriousness with which spiritual leaders, “those who have rule over you”, are to exercising constant vigilance over their human flock (Hebrews 13:17).

In our study text of Ephesians 6:18, Paul uses watch to encourage his readers “to be intentional” in their prayers; and their prayers were to focus specifically on the saints of God.  Why?  Because Satan hates the church collectively and believers individually.  Satan especially targets the Church and believers in order to discredit our witness, to discourage our service for the Lord, and to destroy us—spiritually, physically, and emotionally (1 Pet. 5:8).

Jesus was intentional in His prayers for His disciples and His future Church.

Are we then exempted from responsibility to pray for one another?  Are spiritual and moral failures within the church a result of human frailty or are they the casualty of “our failure to pray” and cover our brothers in Christ?  Let us in our daily prayers include those who battle alongside us for the Kingdom of God.  Let no believer fall from Satan’s attack as a result of our failure to “watch and pray.”

SELAH:  Ask the Holy Spirit to show you who He wants you to be more “watchful” for in your daily prayers.  Look for those outside your immediate friends and family.

Pray Without Ceasing

“Never stop praying.” 1 Thess. 5:17 (Phillips Translation)

Last week, I responded to the call of the National Day of Prayer with a personal challenge for believers to move from an occasional, event driven-prayer life to one with greater intentionality and commitment.  For many of us, this may be a very difficult assignment in that most believers, even biblical scholars may admit to feelings of inadequacy when it comes to prayer.  What do you say to the Creator of Heaven and Earth?  We struggle to find the right words or phrase as we attempt to communicate with the Most High God.  Do we use the “ACTS” prayer formula—adoration, confession, thanksgiving, supplication?  Should we follow the Lord’s Prayer outlined in Matthew 6?  Are our prayers to be made in the morning or in the evening?  Do we stand, sit, or kneel?  Should hands be lifted or placed covering our heads?

To add to our personal prayer dilemma, Paul admonishes believers to pray without ceasing.  What does that mean and how do you do it?  To me, praying without ceasing is neither a pattern nor a spiritual event.  It is an attitude we adopt as part of our Christian life style.  Praying without ceasing is

Purposeful.  We come to hear from God.  Our motivation to pray may vary—upon reading His Word, facing a problem or in anticipation of a particular event.  While prayer is initiated by believers, we must also be “eager listeners” as God responds to our petitions and supplications.  He desires to act on our behalf (2 Chron. 16:9).

Relational.  We spend time with God.  It is here that we begin to understand His nature—His ways and His works.  He is “Abba Father”, so we approach Him as the loving nurturer and protector of our soul and life. In prayer we can be “totally transparent” showing Him all our faults and flaws.  He knows our heart (Ps. 103:13-14).

Dynamic.  We can come to God in the morning, throughout the day, or at the close of the day.  Our prayers should never be “repetitive babblings” but genuine expressions of our needs and concerns.  We often do not know how to pray about a particular situation or for a person.  We can depend on the Holy Spirit to guide our petitions (Rom.8:26-27).

Inclusive.  We are sensitive to the Holy Spirit as He identifies the needs of those around us.  Prayer is not just about us.  God will send people through divine appointments who need our prayers. We are to pray for those God “puts on our hearts”—our leaders, our nation, even our enemies. We are to pray for all saints (Eph. 6:18).

As we pray without ceasing, let us take a KISS approach—Keep It Simple Saints.  One of the greatest privileges we have as believers is to bring our prayers to a holy and powerful God.  Let us come to Him ready to hear and obey. Never stop praying.

SELAH:  For your time of quiet contemplation, I leave you with a bit of levity on prayer from a poem that features four men discussing prayer.  I believe God does have a sense of humor!

 

“THE PROPER WAY for a man to pray,”

Said Deacon Lemuel Keyes,

“And the only proper attitude,

Is down upon his knees.”

“No, I should say the way to pray,”

Said Reverend Doctor Wise,

“Is standing straight, with outstretched arms,

And rapt and upturned eyes.”

“Oh no; no, no,” said Elder Slow,

“Such posture is too proud:

A man should pray with eyes fast closed

And head contritely bowed.”

“It seems to me his hands should be

Austerely clasped in front,

With both thumbs pointing toward the ground,”

Said Reverend Doctor Blunt.

“Las’ year I fell in Hodgkin’s well

Head first,” said Cyrus Brown,

“With both my heels a-stickin’ up,

My head a-p’inting down;

An’ I made a prayer right then an’ there—

Best prayer I ever said,

The prayingest prayer I ever prayed,

A-standing on my head.”