Tag Archives: God’s plan for life

Things Revealed

The secret things belong to the LORD our God,

but the things revealed belong to us and to our children forever,

that we may follow all the words of this law. Deut. 29:29 (NIV)

It is the nature of man to be curious about “secret things”—things that are yet to be revealed; things that remain hidden from immediate view. This curiosity has led to man’s fascination with astrology, fortune telling and other “future gazing” activities. Secret things have contributed to the bizarre growth in social media followings, gossip tabloids and entertainment shows that uncover the latest exposés of the rich and the famous. As the children of Israel prepared to enter the Promised Land, they were more than curious as to what secret things God had planned for their lives. Moses addressed their curiosity with a clever statement of fact about the revelations of God that still holds true today—“the secret things belong to the LORD but the things revealed belong to us.”

The secret things are those things known only to God. The prophet Isaiah best captures this truth in the difference between human and divine knowledge: “His (God’s) thoughts are not our thoughts, nor our ways His ways. As the heavens are higher than earth, so are His ways and thoughts higher than ours” (Isa. 55:8-9). While man may feel that he has the right to be aware of all plans pertaining to his future, it is sovereign God who ultimately determines what needs to be known and what must be accepted by faith alone. “The just shall live by faith” is an iconic expression of trust and hope that encourages believers to proceed without all the answers confident in God’s goodness and greatness (Jer. 29:11-13).

The things that belong to us are those truths which God has communicated through His Holy Spirit and through His Word. With the coming of Pentecost, believers were gifted with the Holy Spirit to live within them. Jesus provided not only a Comforter with the Holy Spirit but also His Presence to guide believers in all truth (John 16:13). God’s Word continues to reveal His nature and His never ending love for His people. From Genesis to Revelation, God discloses Himself as the Master Creator seeking to restore His relationship with His beloved Creature. The greatest evidence of God’s persistence and love is His plan of salvation resulting in man’s freedom from the penalty of death, our reconciliation with the Father, power to live victoriously, and the promise of eternal life, beginning now (1 John 3:2).

Through the things that belong to us we gain a thorough knowledge of God and what is needed to live godly lives (2 Pet. 1:3). Our challenge will come in our ability to walk in the truth that God has revealed to us and to obediently follow His directions. Shifting societal and moral norms will force believers to “stand fast” in that which has been clearly revealed by God (Eph. 6:11-13; 2 Thess. 2:15). Such shifts will lead to continual rejection of Christian beliefs and persecution by this fallen world (2 Tim. 3:12). However, Jesus has more than adequately prepared us for such a time as these: “These things I have spoken to you, that in Me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation; but be of good cheer, I have overcome the world” (John 16:33). As believers we need not concern ourselves with the secret things we don’t know BUT to trust and obey that which we do know.

The Reason for New Things

But if the LORD make a new thing and the earth open her mouth, and swallow them up, with all that appertain unto them, and they go down quick into the pit; then ye shall understand that these men have provoked the LORD.  Num. 16:30 (KJV) 

It is human nature to resist doing new things even if new things offer more than the status quo.  Our text takes us to the Book of Numbers where we observe the impact of a nation’s resistance to God and His divine purpose for their life.  What should have been an eleven-day journey resulted in a forty year “funeral procession” (Num. 14:28-29; 32-35).  Regardless of Israel’s opposition, God would show them a reason for His new thing.

From the time of their departure, Israel complained and was rebellious against not only the leadership of Moses and Aaron but also against God Himself.  Israel had seen the many miracles of God yet “Israel had Egypt in their hearts, regardless of what God did for them even as they marched into the wilderness.”[1]

Where is your heart?  When God attempts to move you to your divine purpose, do you complain and murmur?  Is your affection set on the things of this world when God’s plan offers much more? (Col. 3:2-4)

Motivated by jealousy and envy, Korah, Dathan, and Abiram attempted to seize the priesthood from Aaron and his sons. In so doing, they also challenged the sovereignty and authority of God. In the wilderness, God would teach Israel a painful lesson about the reason for “new things”—about sacrifice, authority, and responsibility.  [Read Numbers 15:1-20:13]  That “new thing” would come with a price—it would cost Korah, Dathan, and Abiram their life, their families’ lives plus the lives of 14,700 people within Israel’s camp.

One of the reasons for God’s severity in punishing Israel was to prepare the way for His new thing—a people who would accept the “new beginning” He had readied for them in the Promised Land.  It would be there that Israel would experience new victories, a new priest (Eleazar), a new leader (Joshua), and a new generation.

How does God use “new things” in our life?

  • God might need to reset or reboot our current efforts. Stalled plans, ungodly influences or fleshly lusts can often take us off the path God sovereignly chooses for us.  God’s intervention will guarantee success. (Phil. 1:6)
  • God may desire to take us out of our comfort zone. He may even allow “trials and tribulations” into our life to move us forward.  In trusting and waiting on the Lord, we find courage to persevere as we pursue God’s plan for our life.  (1 Pet. 1:6-7)
  • God could choose to introduce us to an opportunity that may not have been on our radar screen. It is in those moments we can depend wholly on God to bring prospects into our life that will result in our good and His glory.   (Matt. 7:11)

God always has a reason for introducing new things into our life.  They may not be easy but they are always worth it.  We may not understand “why” but we can trust “Who” (God).

In the past when faced with new things, I was like Israel, guilty of complaining and murmuring.  Out of fear and frustration, I would cry, “Lord, why me?” I now choose God’s path for my life and when faced with “new things” I sigh in faith and confidence, “Lord, it’s YOU and me!”

[1]   Wiersbe Bible Commentary

Life Lived Desperately Seeking

What’s there to show for a lifetime of work, a lifetime of working your fingers to the bone?

Ecclesiastes 1:3 (The Message)

I recently read an article entitled The Top 10 Things People Want in Life but Can’t Seem to Get.  I was amazed in reading the responses to this informal survey that probed a number of “critical life and career questions.”  This further piqued my curiosity leading me to find other “lists” of how individuals might feel about their current lives.

As I read the various articles, the words “desperately seeking” came to mind.  Therein was the birthing of this new series entitled, Desperately Seeking.  During this series, I’ll be using three (3) lenses to examine the real issues behind our desperate search for the things we feel will make our lives better.  They include:  (1) the current situation, (2) the worldview, and (3) God’s view.  As you follow with me, it is my hope that you will better understand God’s plan for your life and be able to quickly extinguish any desperation you might currently be experiencing.  Let me begin by sharing the current situation.

Desperation is defined as a state of despair or distress, typically one that results in rash or extreme behavior—even reckless or dangerous. Desperation is sometimes described as hopelessness.  How would you describe the world today?  You need only look at your phone, notebook, or other source of information to experience the alarming state of our world.

As we view the larger global issues of this nation and world, it is evident that the current political, social, and financial climate cannot be resolved through traditional methods or approaches.  Our hope that technology would offer the panacea to all our problems is daily being dashed as it presents its own set of “new problems” in the form of ethical dilemmas, moral failures, and social shortfalls.  Tricia McCary Rhodes in her book, The Wired Soul, captures this feeling of distress.

I am not personally prone to panic attacks, but these days there are moments when I find myself out of sorts, almost as if I can’t quite catch my breath. I don’t think I’m alone in this. People of all ages seem terminally distracted, perpetually hurried, and often harried.  It is rare for an answer to the question “how are you?” not to include the word busy and elicit some degree of angst. Collectively it feels as if we are losing something important in the name of progress, as if life itself is slipping through our fingers.

But the real challenge of desperation comes, not only globally, but “up close and personal”.   It comes as individuals look in the mirror and ask, “What about those things that I want in life but can’t seem to get?”  From my reading, I compiled (in their order of importance) the top five (5) areas people are feeling desperate about:  happiness, money, freedom, peace, and joy.   I’ve included a sixth, since it seems the focus of many Millennials and Gen xers—balance.

Examination of this list resulted in the following observations.  What’s surprising are the things missing from the list.

1)  The list contains more intangibles that tangibles (money).  Why?

2)  The list is more subjective (what I can feel) than objective.  Why?

3)  The list focuses on “internal” versus “external”.  Why?

What can be said about a “life lived desperately seeking”?  Why are we desperate?  What’s missing in our lives and why can’t we get it?  Join us as we “desperately seek” answers to these and other questions.  Please share this devotional with your friends who might be feeling desperate.  Feel free to share your thoughts on this new series  in the “Comments Box” at the bottom of this page.